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Prostate Cancer Awareness Month: Navigating an Increasingly Complex Disease

By Joan Venticinque, PAC member on Sep 14, 2020 10:56:38 AM

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During September, Prostate Cancer Awareness month draws attention to prostate cancer screening and those living with the disease. Over the years, my grandfather, father, and four close friends have received a prostate cancer diagnosis. Their ages range from 40s to their 90s and their diagnoses varied from early stage through metastatic disease. For all of them, their diagnosis was both unexpected and distressing. They were fearful and overwhelmed at the prospect of being asked to take a more active role in their treatment decision-making, often without understanding the diagnosis, treatment plan, or prognosis.

–“I have seen three different doctors, and all recommend a different treatment plan. How do I know what to do?” –Jeff

There is so much confusion about screening and treatment for prostate cancer. “I’ve heard measuring PSA is not an accurate test.” “It’s slow growing, so why worry?” “They say all men will have it [prostate cancer] in their lifetime, so why go to the doctor?” “How will the different treatments effect my sex life?” The array of available treatments varies widely from surgery to radiation, anti-hormonal medication, immunotherapy, gene therapy, and watchful waiting. What do patients believe and how do they decide what to do? These questions demonstrate the need for clinical trials that provide the answer of the ‘right’ screening and treatment for the ‘right’ patient.

–“I did as much research as I could and had two second opinions. I found a clinical trial for a new type of radiation treatment. I was glad I did. It was important that I found the right treatment for myself.”–Jack

New Treatment Options as a Result of New Screening Modalities & Therapies-graphic

 

Clinical trials play a vital role in moving new screening modalities and treatments to patients. Recent screening trials have included combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with ultrasound for more accurate prostate biopsies. This method can increase the detection of high-grade prostate cancers while decreasing detection of low-grade cancers that would not progress. New imaging techniques also include using a PET scan that looks for a specific protein called prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) found on prostate cancer cells.  The ability to detect very small amounts of metastatic prostate cancer could help doctors and patients make better-informed treatment decisions.

Targeted Therapies for a Complex Disease in the Age of Precision Medicine

Targeted therapies based on PSMA, the same protein that is being tested for imaging prostate cancer, are being studied for radiation treatment.  The molecule that targets PSMA is chemically linked to a radioactive compound. The new compound can potentially find, bind to, and kill prostate cancer cells throughout the body.

 Over the last few years, several new approaches to hormone therapy for advanced or metastatic prostate cancer have been approved for clinical use. Many prostate cancers become resistant to standard hormonal treatment over time. After successful trials, three recently approved drugs have been shown to extend survival in men with hormone-resistant prostate cancer.

Current trials are using immunotherapies that work with the immune system to fight cancer. These therapies can either help the immune system attack the cancer directly or stimulate the immune system in a more general way. Currently, vaccines and checkpoint inhibitors, two types of immunotherapy, are being tested in patients with prostate cancer. 

–“I relied on my doctors for my treatment plan, but it wasn’t until I joined a support group and realized everyone was different with different choices, including clinical trials, that I felt more comfortable with my decisions.” –Larry

 

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My family members and friends eventually all made their treatment decisions. Given their age differences and goals for their therapies, each one had a different treatment plan. Although my grandfather is gone, others live with side-effects. Still, others are on treatment for the rest of their lives without much in the way of side-effects. All benefited from patients who participated in clinical trials. Without clinical trials we may never understand what the ‘right’ screening and treatment will be for the ‘right’ patient.

 

Topics: decentralized trials PAC RareDisease prostate cancer cancer awareness